thatfuckingtableflipper:

smellestine:

raisehelia:

geekykristie:

angelacarterofmars:


Girl meets world addresses Cultural appropriation

this is actually embarassingly wrong, though. sure, she looks tacky but this is a purely white liberal construct we’re looking at here. generally speaking, people in contemporary japan aren’t going to see something like that as misappropriation, and it hardly makes sense to even try to look at it that way because harajuku is, you know, a shopping district that sells mass produced clothing. maybe this girl is doing something else noxious in the episode, but what’s presented here just isn’t that.
there is of course a line in the sand, and in this case in specific it’s basically between nicki minaj and gwen stefani. nicki was, and maybe still does, calling herself harajuku barbie because she’s drawn a lot of inspiration for her looks from the bright, colourful styles of the district. a district in a wealthy industrialized nation. there’s no real difference between that and calling herself rodeo drive barbie or camden square barbie. gwen stefani, you know, was paying asian women to follow her around like ornaments. that’s a problem.
i get kind of suspicious when people, especially in mainstream tv, overwhelmingly go after “weaboos” as soft targets because it seems like a smokescreen to avoid going after the actually deeply troublesome and normalized acts of commodifying and trivializing marginalized groups.
also, a teacher dragging a teenage girl that hard in front of her entire class is fucked up.

I saw this like seven times yesterday scrolling on my phone and wasn’t about to start on it from there - but yeah pretty much what you said. People are ready to leap on those they perceive as weeaboos but people forget or ignore that Harajuku (and anime) is for sale.
Love of my life Kyary Pamyu Pamyu is the official Ambassador of Kawaii, as in it is a real part of her fashion-fused-musical-career as ordained by the government to promote Japanese kawaii culture and Harajuku fashions to the rest of the world in an effort to bump international attention, tourism, and sales. There are without a doubt social movements/ideas particular to the culture embedded in the different areas of Japanese fashion and act as a response to the culture - but frankly, overall, a lot of Japanese fashion is fashion. It exists for an aesthetic; it exists for expression; it exists for influence and ultimately consumption; and today more than ever it exists for export.
Sitting around and pointing a finger at every Japanese fashion labeling it as deeply intrinsic and important and special and exclusive to the culture is harmful; by doing so you are denying a contemporary creative base the autonomy to evolve and speak for itself. “Japan is a land of tradition” yeah, okay, but it doesn’t live in a fucking vacuum trembling from fear of the peeking gaijin.
What is happening here is a young girl is dressed in a fashion she cannot identify, which can be a case of cultural appropriation when “plagiarizing and/or thieving” is the mode of operation. For example: Someone latching on to a visual they saw while watching a Japanese film/whatever then went on to claim the style as their own creation and started selling it without ever acknowledging their influences or affirming the creatives whose work they are leeching from. Which is of course a lot to assume of a middle schooler to be intentionally doing. 
And that is totally Cory laying the smack down on his own daughter in front of an entire class. Double messed up. 

Wait, if that is his daughter, then, isn’t he ultimately responsible for actually paying for these clothes?
Did he let her buy these clothes so he could shame her in class? what the hell.

I think I want to see this episode myself. What I’m seeing from just this though is a confusion of cultural appropriation and cultural DIFFUSION.
I had to explain this to someone using Bronies as an example (Which was a bad idea because he desperately wanted to paint bronies in a positive light being a brony himself.) That enjoying the show is diffusion and taking it away from the source and claiming it never belonged to the source (“this show isn’t for little girls”) is appropriation.
What I think people are getting confused about here is the fetishization of a culture. Like fetishizing people. Pretending you are a part of the culture’s traditions, wearing them like a fashion. I don’t speak for the japanese but I cannot fucking see a fashion being appropriated unless someone literally steals the idea and that only matters if someone is making money off of stolen designs.
She’s enjoying a consumer aspect of a culture. Her presentation is tacky but who in their right mind should really give a shit about that?

Christ thank you thatfuckingtableflipper:

smellestine:

raisehelia:

geekykristie:

angelacarterofmars:


Girl meets world addresses Cultural appropriation

this is actually embarassingly wrong, though. sure, she looks tacky but this is a purely white liberal construct we’re looking at here. generally speaking, people in contemporary japan aren’t going to see something like that as misappropriation, and it hardly makes sense to even try to look at it that way because harajuku is, you know, a shopping district that sells mass produced clothing. maybe this girl is doing something else noxious in the episode, but what’s presented here just isn’t that.
there is of course a line in the sand, and in this case in specific it’s basically between nicki minaj and gwen stefani. nicki was, and maybe still does, calling herself harajuku barbie because she’s drawn a lot of inspiration for her looks from the bright, colourful styles of the district. a district in a wealthy industrialized nation. there’s no real difference between that and calling herself rodeo drive barbie or camden square barbie. gwen stefani, you know, was paying asian women to follow her around like ornaments. that’s a problem.
i get kind of suspicious when people, especially in mainstream tv, overwhelmingly go after “weaboos” as soft targets because it seems like a smokescreen to avoid going after the actually deeply troublesome and normalized acts of commodifying and trivializing marginalized groups.
also, a teacher dragging a teenage girl that hard in front of her entire class is fucked up.

I saw this like seven times yesterday scrolling on my phone and wasn’t about to start on it from there - but yeah pretty much what you said. People are ready to leap on those they perceive as weeaboos but people forget or ignore that Harajuku (and anime) is for sale.
Love of my life Kyary Pamyu Pamyu is the official Ambassador of Kawaii, as in it is a real part of her fashion-fused-musical-career as ordained by the government to promote Japanese kawaii culture and Harajuku fashions to the rest of the world in an effort to bump international attention, tourism, and sales. There are without a doubt social movements/ideas particular to the culture embedded in the different areas of Japanese fashion and act as a response to the culture - but frankly, overall, a lot of Japanese fashion is fashion. It exists for an aesthetic; it exists for expression; it exists for influence and ultimately consumption; and today more than ever it exists for export.
Sitting around and pointing a finger at every Japanese fashion labeling it as deeply intrinsic and important and special and exclusive to the culture is harmful; by doing so you are denying a contemporary creative base the autonomy to evolve and speak for itself. “Japan is a land of tradition” yeah, okay, but it doesn’t live in a fucking vacuum trembling from fear of the peeking gaijin.
What is happening here is a young girl is dressed in a fashion she cannot identify, which can be a case of cultural appropriation when “plagiarizing and/or thieving” is the mode of operation. For example: Someone latching on to a visual they saw while watching a Japanese film/whatever then went on to claim the style as their own creation and started selling it without ever acknowledging their influences or affirming the creatives whose work they are leeching from. Which is of course a lot to assume of a middle schooler to be intentionally doing. 
And that is totally Cory laying the smack down on his own daughter in front of an entire class. Double messed up. 

Wait, if that is his daughter, then, isn’t he ultimately responsible for actually paying for these clothes?
Did he let her buy these clothes so he could shame her in class? what the hell.

I think I want to see this episode myself. What I’m seeing from just this though is a confusion of cultural appropriation and cultural DIFFUSION.
I had to explain this to someone using Bronies as an example (Which was a bad idea because he desperately wanted to paint bronies in a positive light being a brony himself.) That enjoying the show is diffusion and taking it away from the source and claiming it never belonged to the source (“this show isn’t for little girls”) is appropriation.
What I think people are getting confused about here is the fetishization of a culture. Like fetishizing people. Pretending you are a part of the culture’s traditions, wearing them like a fashion. I don’t speak for the japanese but I cannot fucking see a fashion being appropriated unless someone literally steals the idea and that only matters if someone is making money off of stolen designs.
She’s enjoying a consumer aspect of a culture. Her presentation is tacky but who in their right mind should really give a shit about that?

Christ thank you thatfuckingtableflipper:

smellestine:

raisehelia:

geekykristie:

angelacarterofmars:


Girl meets world addresses Cultural appropriation

this is actually embarassingly wrong, though. sure, she looks tacky but this is a purely white liberal construct we’re looking at here. generally speaking, people in contemporary japan aren’t going to see something like that as misappropriation, and it hardly makes sense to even try to look at it that way because harajuku is, you know, a shopping district that sells mass produced clothing. maybe this girl is doing something else noxious in the episode, but what’s presented here just isn’t that.
there is of course a line in the sand, and in this case in specific it’s basically between nicki minaj and gwen stefani. nicki was, and maybe still does, calling herself harajuku barbie because she’s drawn a lot of inspiration for her looks from the bright, colourful styles of the district. a district in a wealthy industrialized nation. there’s no real difference between that and calling herself rodeo drive barbie or camden square barbie. gwen stefani, you know, was paying asian women to follow her around like ornaments. that’s a problem.
i get kind of suspicious when people, especially in mainstream tv, overwhelmingly go after “weaboos” as soft targets because it seems like a smokescreen to avoid going after the actually deeply troublesome and normalized acts of commodifying and trivializing marginalized groups.
also, a teacher dragging a teenage girl that hard in front of her entire class is fucked up.

I saw this like seven times yesterday scrolling on my phone and wasn’t about to start on it from there - but yeah pretty much what you said. People are ready to leap on those they perceive as weeaboos but people forget or ignore that Harajuku (and anime) is for sale.
Love of my life Kyary Pamyu Pamyu is the official Ambassador of Kawaii, as in it is a real part of her fashion-fused-musical-career as ordained by the government to promote Japanese kawaii culture and Harajuku fashions to the rest of the world in an effort to bump international attention, tourism, and sales. There are without a doubt social movements/ideas particular to the culture embedded in the different areas of Japanese fashion and act as a response to the culture - but frankly, overall, a lot of Japanese fashion is fashion. It exists for an aesthetic; it exists for expression; it exists for influence and ultimately consumption; and today more than ever it exists for export.
Sitting around and pointing a finger at every Japanese fashion labeling it as deeply intrinsic and important and special and exclusive to the culture is harmful; by doing so you are denying a contemporary creative base the autonomy to evolve and speak for itself. “Japan is a land of tradition” yeah, okay, but it doesn’t live in a fucking vacuum trembling from fear of the peeking gaijin.
What is happening here is a young girl is dressed in a fashion she cannot identify, which can be a case of cultural appropriation when “plagiarizing and/or thieving” is the mode of operation. For example: Someone latching on to a visual they saw while watching a Japanese film/whatever then went on to claim the style as their own creation and started selling it without ever acknowledging their influences or affirming the creatives whose work they are leeching from. Which is of course a lot to assume of a middle schooler to be intentionally doing. 
And that is totally Cory laying the smack down on his own daughter in front of an entire class. Double messed up. 

Wait, if that is his daughter, then, isn’t he ultimately responsible for actually paying for these clothes?
Did he let her buy these clothes so he could shame her in class? what the hell.

I think I want to see this episode myself. What I’m seeing from just this though is a confusion of cultural appropriation and cultural DIFFUSION.
I had to explain this to someone using Bronies as an example (Which was a bad idea because he desperately wanted to paint bronies in a positive light being a brony himself.) That enjoying the show is diffusion and taking it away from the source and claiming it never belonged to the source (“this show isn’t for little girls”) is appropriation.
What I think people are getting confused about here is the fetishization of a culture. Like fetishizing people. Pretending you are a part of the culture’s traditions, wearing them like a fashion. I don’t speak for the japanese but I cannot fucking see a fashion being appropriated unless someone literally steals the idea and that only matters if someone is making money off of stolen designs.
She’s enjoying a consumer aspect of a culture. Her presentation is tacky but who in their right mind should really give a shit about that?

Christ thank you thatfuckingtableflipper:

smellestine:

raisehelia:

geekykristie:

angelacarterofmars:


Girl meets world addresses Cultural appropriation

this is actually embarassingly wrong, though. sure, she looks tacky but this is a purely white liberal construct we’re looking at here. generally speaking, people in contemporary japan aren’t going to see something like that as misappropriation, and it hardly makes sense to even try to look at it that way because harajuku is, you know, a shopping district that sells mass produced clothing. maybe this girl is doing something else noxious in the episode, but what’s presented here just isn’t that.
there is of course a line in the sand, and in this case in specific it’s basically between nicki minaj and gwen stefani. nicki was, and maybe still does, calling herself harajuku barbie because she’s drawn a lot of inspiration for her looks from the bright, colourful styles of the district. a district in a wealthy industrialized nation. there’s no real difference between that and calling herself rodeo drive barbie or camden square barbie. gwen stefani, you know, was paying asian women to follow her around like ornaments. that’s a problem.
i get kind of suspicious when people, especially in mainstream tv, overwhelmingly go after “weaboos” as soft targets because it seems like a smokescreen to avoid going after the actually deeply troublesome and normalized acts of commodifying and trivializing marginalized groups.
also, a teacher dragging a teenage girl that hard in front of her entire class is fucked up.

I saw this like seven times yesterday scrolling on my phone and wasn’t about to start on it from there - but yeah pretty much what you said. People are ready to leap on those they perceive as weeaboos but people forget or ignore that Harajuku (and anime) is for sale.
Love of my life Kyary Pamyu Pamyu is the official Ambassador of Kawaii, as in it is a real part of her fashion-fused-musical-career as ordained by the government to promote Japanese kawaii culture and Harajuku fashions to the rest of the world in an effort to bump international attention, tourism, and sales. There are without a doubt social movements/ideas particular to the culture embedded in the different areas of Japanese fashion and act as a response to the culture - but frankly, overall, a lot of Japanese fashion is fashion. It exists for an aesthetic; it exists for expression; it exists for influence and ultimately consumption; and today more than ever it exists for export.
Sitting around and pointing a finger at every Japanese fashion labeling it as deeply intrinsic and important and special and exclusive to the culture is harmful; by doing so you are denying a contemporary creative base the autonomy to evolve and speak for itself. “Japan is a land of tradition” yeah, okay, but it doesn’t live in a fucking vacuum trembling from fear of the peeking gaijin.
What is happening here is a young girl is dressed in a fashion she cannot identify, which can be a case of cultural appropriation when “plagiarizing and/or thieving” is the mode of operation. For example: Someone latching on to a visual they saw while watching a Japanese film/whatever then went on to claim the style as their own creation and started selling it without ever acknowledging their influences or affirming the creatives whose work they are leeching from. Which is of course a lot to assume of a middle schooler to be intentionally doing. 
And that is totally Cory laying the smack down on his own daughter in front of an entire class. Double messed up. 

Wait, if that is his daughter, then, isn’t he ultimately responsible for actually paying for these clothes?
Did he let her buy these clothes so he could shame her in class? what the hell.

I think I want to see this episode myself. What I’m seeing from just this though is a confusion of cultural appropriation and cultural DIFFUSION.
I had to explain this to someone using Bronies as an example (Which was a bad idea because he desperately wanted to paint bronies in a positive light being a brony himself.) That enjoying the show is diffusion and taking it away from the source and claiming it never belonged to the source (“this show isn’t for little girls”) is appropriation.
What I think people are getting confused about here is the fetishization of a culture. Like fetishizing people. Pretending you are a part of the culture’s traditions, wearing them like a fashion. I don’t speak for the japanese but I cannot fucking see a fashion being appropriated unless someone literally steals the idea and that only matters if someone is making money off of stolen designs.
She’s enjoying a consumer aspect of a culture. Her presentation is tacky but who in their right mind should really give a shit about that?

Christ thank you thatfuckingtableflipper:

smellestine:

raisehelia:

geekykristie:

angelacarterofmars:


Girl meets world addresses Cultural appropriation

this is actually embarassingly wrong, though. sure, she looks tacky but this is a purely white liberal construct we’re looking at here. generally speaking, people in contemporary japan aren’t going to see something like that as misappropriation, and it hardly makes sense to even try to look at it that way because harajuku is, you know, a shopping district that sells mass produced clothing. maybe this girl is doing something else noxious in the episode, but what’s presented here just isn’t that.
there is of course a line in the sand, and in this case in specific it’s basically between nicki minaj and gwen stefani. nicki was, and maybe still does, calling herself harajuku barbie because she’s drawn a lot of inspiration for her looks from the bright, colourful styles of the district. a district in a wealthy industrialized nation. there’s no real difference between that and calling herself rodeo drive barbie or camden square barbie. gwen stefani, you know, was paying asian women to follow her around like ornaments. that’s a problem.
i get kind of suspicious when people, especially in mainstream tv, overwhelmingly go after “weaboos” as soft targets because it seems like a smokescreen to avoid going after the actually deeply troublesome and normalized acts of commodifying and trivializing marginalized groups.
also, a teacher dragging a teenage girl that hard in front of her entire class is fucked up.

I saw this like seven times yesterday scrolling on my phone and wasn’t about to start on it from there - but yeah pretty much what you said. People are ready to leap on those they perceive as weeaboos but people forget or ignore that Harajuku (and anime) is for sale.
Love of my life Kyary Pamyu Pamyu is the official Ambassador of Kawaii, as in it is a real part of her fashion-fused-musical-career as ordained by the government to promote Japanese kawaii culture and Harajuku fashions to the rest of the world in an effort to bump international attention, tourism, and sales. There are without a doubt social movements/ideas particular to the culture embedded in the different areas of Japanese fashion and act as a response to the culture - but frankly, overall, a lot of Japanese fashion is fashion. It exists for an aesthetic; it exists for expression; it exists for influence and ultimately consumption; and today more than ever it exists for export.
Sitting around and pointing a finger at every Japanese fashion labeling it as deeply intrinsic and important and special and exclusive to the culture is harmful; by doing so you are denying a contemporary creative base the autonomy to evolve and speak for itself. “Japan is a land of tradition” yeah, okay, but it doesn’t live in a fucking vacuum trembling from fear of the peeking gaijin.
What is happening here is a young girl is dressed in a fashion she cannot identify, which can be a case of cultural appropriation when “plagiarizing and/or thieving” is the mode of operation. For example: Someone latching on to a visual they saw while watching a Japanese film/whatever then went on to claim the style as their own creation and started selling it without ever acknowledging their influences or affirming the creatives whose work they are leeching from. Which is of course a lot to assume of a middle schooler to be intentionally doing. 
And that is totally Cory laying the smack down on his own daughter in front of an entire class. Double messed up. 

Wait, if that is his daughter, then, isn’t he ultimately responsible for actually paying for these clothes?
Did he let her buy these clothes so he could shame her in class? what the hell.

I think I want to see this episode myself. What I’m seeing from just this though is a confusion of cultural appropriation and cultural DIFFUSION.
I had to explain this to someone using Bronies as an example (Which was a bad idea because he desperately wanted to paint bronies in a positive light being a brony himself.) That enjoying the show is diffusion and taking it away from the source and claiming it never belonged to the source (“this show isn’t for little girls”) is appropriation.
What I think people are getting confused about here is the fetishization of a culture. Like fetishizing people. Pretending you are a part of the culture’s traditions, wearing them like a fashion. I don’t speak for the japanese but I cannot fucking see a fashion being appropriated unless someone literally steals the idea and that only matters if someone is making money off of stolen designs.
She’s enjoying a consumer aspect of a culture. Her presentation is tacky but who in their right mind should really give a shit about that?

Christ thank you thatfuckingtableflipper:

smellestine:

raisehelia:

geekykristie:

angelacarterofmars:


Girl meets world addresses Cultural appropriation

this is actually embarassingly wrong, though. sure, she looks tacky but this is a purely white liberal construct we’re looking at here. generally speaking, people in contemporary japan aren’t going to see something like that as misappropriation, and it hardly makes sense to even try to look at it that way because harajuku is, you know, a shopping district that sells mass produced clothing. maybe this girl is doing something else noxious in the episode, but what’s presented here just isn’t that.
there is of course a line in the sand, and in this case in specific it’s basically between nicki minaj and gwen stefani. nicki was, and maybe still does, calling herself harajuku barbie because she’s drawn a lot of inspiration for her looks from the bright, colourful styles of the district. a district in a wealthy industrialized nation. there’s no real difference between that and calling herself rodeo drive barbie or camden square barbie. gwen stefani, you know, was paying asian women to follow her around like ornaments. that’s a problem.
i get kind of suspicious when people, especially in mainstream tv, overwhelmingly go after “weaboos” as soft targets because it seems like a smokescreen to avoid going after the actually deeply troublesome and normalized acts of commodifying and trivializing marginalized groups.
also, a teacher dragging a teenage girl that hard in front of her entire class is fucked up.

I saw this like seven times yesterday scrolling on my phone and wasn’t about to start on it from there - but yeah pretty much what you said. People are ready to leap on those they perceive as weeaboos but people forget or ignore that Harajuku (and anime) is for sale.
Love of my life Kyary Pamyu Pamyu is the official Ambassador of Kawaii, as in it is a real part of her fashion-fused-musical-career as ordained by the government to promote Japanese kawaii culture and Harajuku fashions to the rest of the world in an effort to bump international attention, tourism, and sales. There are without a doubt social movements/ideas particular to the culture embedded in the different areas of Japanese fashion and act as a response to the culture - but frankly, overall, a lot of Japanese fashion is fashion. It exists for an aesthetic; it exists for expression; it exists for influence and ultimately consumption; and today more than ever it exists for export.
Sitting around and pointing a finger at every Japanese fashion labeling it as deeply intrinsic and important and special and exclusive to the culture is harmful; by doing so you are denying a contemporary creative base the autonomy to evolve and speak for itself. “Japan is a land of tradition” yeah, okay, but it doesn’t live in a fucking vacuum trembling from fear of the peeking gaijin.
What is happening here is a young girl is dressed in a fashion she cannot identify, which can be a case of cultural appropriation when “plagiarizing and/or thieving” is the mode of operation. For example: Someone latching on to a visual they saw while watching a Japanese film/whatever then went on to claim the style as their own creation and started selling it without ever acknowledging their influences or affirming the creatives whose work they are leeching from. Which is of course a lot to assume of a middle schooler to be intentionally doing. 
And that is totally Cory laying the smack down on his own daughter in front of an entire class. Double messed up. 

Wait, if that is his daughter, then, isn’t he ultimately responsible for actually paying for these clothes?
Did he let her buy these clothes so he could shame her in class? what the hell.

I think I want to see this episode myself. What I’m seeing from just this though is a confusion of cultural appropriation and cultural DIFFUSION.
I had to explain this to someone using Bronies as an example (Which was a bad idea because he desperately wanted to paint bronies in a positive light being a brony himself.) That enjoying the show is diffusion and taking it away from the source and claiming it never belonged to the source (“this show isn’t for little girls”) is appropriation.
What I think people are getting confused about here is the fetishization of a culture. Like fetishizing people. Pretending you are a part of the culture’s traditions, wearing them like a fashion. I don’t speak for the japanese but I cannot fucking see a fashion being appropriated unless someone literally steals the idea and that only matters if someone is making money off of stolen designs.
She’s enjoying a consumer aspect of a culture. Her presentation is tacky but who in their right mind should really give a shit about that?

Christ thank you thatfuckingtableflipper:

smellestine:

raisehelia:

geekykristie:

angelacarterofmars:


Girl meets world addresses Cultural appropriation

this is actually embarassingly wrong, though. sure, she looks tacky but this is a purely white liberal construct we’re looking at here. generally speaking, people in contemporary japan aren’t going to see something like that as misappropriation, and it hardly makes sense to even try to look at it that way because harajuku is, you know, a shopping district that sells mass produced clothing. maybe this girl is doing something else noxious in the episode, but what’s presented here just isn’t that.
there is of course a line in the sand, and in this case in specific it’s basically between nicki minaj and gwen stefani. nicki was, and maybe still does, calling herself harajuku barbie because she’s drawn a lot of inspiration for her looks from the bright, colourful styles of the district. a district in a wealthy industrialized nation. there’s no real difference between that and calling herself rodeo drive barbie or camden square barbie. gwen stefani, you know, was paying asian women to follow her around like ornaments. that’s a problem.
i get kind of suspicious when people, especially in mainstream tv, overwhelmingly go after “weaboos” as soft targets because it seems like a smokescreen to avoid going after the actually deeply troublesome and normalized acts of commodifying and trivializing marginalized groups.
also, a teacher dragging a teenage girl that hard in front of her entire class is fucked up.

I saw this like seven times yesterday scrolling on my phone and wasn’t about to start on it from there - but yeah pretty much what you said. People are ready to leap on those they perceive as weeaboos but people forget or ignore that Harajuku (and anime) is for sale.
Love of my life Kyary Pamyu Pamyu is the official Ambassador of Kawaii, as in it is a real part of her fashion-fused-musical-career as ordained by the government to promote Japanese kawaii culture and Harajuku fashions to the rest of the world in an effort to bump international attention, tourism, and sales. There are without a doubt social movements/ideas particular to the culture embedded in the different areas of Japanese fashion and act as a response to the culture - but frankly, overall, a lot of Japanese fashion is fashion. It exists for an aesthetic; it exists for expression; it exists for influence and ultimately consumption; and today more than ever it exists for export.
Sitting around and pointing a finger at every Japanese fashion labeling it as deeply intrinsic and important and special and exclusive to the culture is harmful; by doing so you are denying a contemporary creative base the autonomy to evolve and speak for itself. “Japan is a land of tradition” yeah, okay, but it doesn’t live in a fucking vacuum trembling from fear of the peeking gaijin.
What is happening here is a young girl is dressed in a fashion she cannot identify, which can be a case of cultural appropriation when “plagiarizing and/or thieving” is the mode of operation. For example: Someone latching on to a visual they saw while watching a Japanese film/whatever then went on to claim the style as their own creation and started selling it without ever acknowledging their influences or affirming the creatives whose work they are leeching from. Which is of course a lot to assume of a middle schooler to be intentionally doing. 
And that is totally Cory laying the smack down on his own daughter in front of an entire class. Double messed up. 

Wait, if that is his daughter, then, isn’t he ultimately responsible for actually paying for these clothes?
Did he let her buy these clothes so he could shame her in class? what the hell.

I think I want to see this episode myself. What I’m seeing from just this though is a confusion of cultural appropriation and cultural DIFFUSION.
I had to explain this to someone using Bronies as an example (Which was a bad idea because he desperately wanted to paint bronies in a positive light being a brony himself.) That enjoying the show is diffusion and taking it away from the source and claiming it never belonged to the source (“this show isn’t for little girls”) is appropriation.
What I think people are getting confused about here is the fetishization of a culture. Like fetishizing people. Pretending you are a part of the culture’s traditions, wearing them like a fashion. I don’t speak for the japanese but I cannot fucking see a fashion being appropriated unless someone literally steals the idea and that only matters if someone is making money off of stolen designs.
She’s enjoying a consumer aspect of a culture. Her presentation is tacky but who in their right mind should really give a shit about that?

Christ thank you thatfuckingtableflipper:

smellestine:

raisehelia:

geekykristie:

angelacarterofmars:


Girl meets world addresses Cultural appropriation

this is actually embarassingly wrong, though. sure, she looks tacky but this is a purely white liberal construct we’re looking at here. generally speaking, people in contemporary japan aren’t going to see something like that as misappropriation, and it hardly makes sense to even try to look at it that way because harajuku is, you know, a shopping district that sells mass produced clothing. maybe this girl is doing something else noxious in the episode, but what’s presented here just isn’t that.
there is of course a line in the sand, and in this case in specific it’s basically between nicki minaj and gwen stefani. nicki was, and maybe still does, calling herself harajuku barbie because she’s drawn a lot of inspiration for her looks from the bright, colourful styles of the district. a district in a wealthy industrialized nation. there’s no real difference between that and calling herself rodeo drive barbie or camden square barbie. gwen stefani, you know, was paying asian women to follow her around like ornaments. that’s a problem.
i get kind of suspicious when people, especially in mainstream tv, overwhelmingly go after “weaboos” as soft targets because it seems like a smokescreen to avoid going after the actually deeply troublesome and normalized acts of commodifying and trivializing marginalized groups.
also, a teacher dragging a teenage girl that hard in front of her entire class is fucked up.

I saw this like seven times yesterday scrolling on my phone and wasn’t about to start on it from there - but yeah pretty much what you said. People are ready to leap on those they perceive as weeaboos but people forget or ignore that Harajuku (and anime) is for sale.
Love of my life Kyary Pamyu Pamyu is the official Ambassador of Kawaii, as in it is a real part of her fashion-fused-musical-career as ordained by the government to promote Japanese kawaii culture and Harajuku fashions to the rest of the world in an effort to bump international attention, tourism, and sales. There are without a doubt social movements/ideas particular to the culture embedded in the different areas of Japanese fashion and act as a response to the culture - but frankly, overall, a lot of Japanese fashion is fashion. It exists for an aesthetic; it exists for expression; it exists for influence and ultimately consumption; and today more than ever it exists for export.
Sitting around and pointing a finger at every Japanese fashion labeling it as deeply intrinsic and important and special and exclusive to the culture is harmful; by doing so you are denying a contemporary creative base the autonomy to evolve and speak for itself. “Japan is a land of tradition” yeah, okay, but it doesn’t live in a fucking vacuum trembling from fear of the peeking gaijin.
What is happening here is a young girl is dressed in a fashion she cannot identify, which can be a case of cultural appropriation when “plagiarizing and/or thieving” is the mode of operation. For example: Someone latching on to a visual they saw while watching a Japanese film/whatever then went on to claim the style as their own creation and started selling it without ever acknowledging their influences or affirming the creatives whose work they are leeching from. Which is of course a lot to assume of a middle schooler to be intentionally doing. 
And that is totally Cory laying the smack down on his own daughter in front of an entire class. Double messed up. 

Wait, if that is his daughter, then, isn’t he ultimately responsible for actually paying for these clothes?
Did he let her buy these clothes so he could shame her in class? what the hell.

I think I want to see this episode myself. What I’m seeing from just this though is a confusion of cultural appropriation and cultural DIFFUSION.
I had to explain this to someone using Bronies as an example (Which was a bad idea because he desperately wanted to paint bronies in a positive light being a brony himself.) That enjoying the show is diffusion and taking it away from the source and claiming it never belonged to the source (“this show isn’t for little girls”) is appropriation.
What I think people are getting confused about here is the fetishization of a culture. Like fetishizing people. Pretending you are a part of the culture’s traditions, wearing them like a fashion. I don’t speak for the japanese but I cannot fucking see a fashion being appropriated unless someone literally steals the idea and that only matters if someone is making money off of stolen designs.
She’s enjoying a consumer aspect of a culture. Her presentation is tacky but who in their right mind should really give a shit about that?

Christ thank you

thatfuckingtableflipper:

smellestine:

raisehelia:

geekykristie:

angelacarterofmars:

Girl meets world addresses Cultural appropriation

this is actually embarassingly wrong, though. sure, she looks tacky but this is a purely white liberal construct we’re looking at here. generally speaking, people in contemporary japan aren’t going to see something like that as misappropriation, and it hardly makes sense to even try to look at it that way because harajuku is, you know, a shopping district that sells mass produced clothing. maybe this girl is doing something else noxious in the episode, but what’s presented here just isn’t that.

there is of course a line in the sand, and in this case in specific it’s basically between nicki minaj and gwen stefani. nicki was, and maybe still does, calling herself harajuku barbie because she’s drawn a lot of inspiration for her looks from the bright, colourful styles of the district. a district in a wealthy industrialized nation. there’s no real difference between that and calling herself rodeo drive barbie or camden square barbie. gwen stefani, you know, was paying asian women to follow her around like ornaments. that’s a problem.

i get kind of suspicious when people, especially in mainstream tv, overwhelmingly go after “weaboos” as soft targets because it seems like a smokescreen to avoid going after the actually deeply troublesome and normalized acts of commodifying and trivializing marginalized groups.

also, a teacher dragging a teenage girl that hard in front of her entire class is fucked up.

I saw this like seven times yesterday scrolling on my phone and wasn’t about to start on it from there - but yeah pretty much what you said. People are ready to leap on those they perceive as weeaboos but people forget or ignore that Harajuku (and anime) is for sale.

Love of my life Kyary Pamyu Pamyu is the official Ambassador of Kawaii, as in it is a real part of her fashion-fused-musical-career as ordained by the government to promote Japanese kawaii culture and Harajuku fashions to the rest of the world in an effort to bump international attention, tourism, and sales. There are without a doubt social movements/ideas particular to the culture embedded in the different areas of Japanese fashion and act as a response to the culture - but frankly, overall, a lot of Japanese fashion is fashion. It exists for an aesthetic; it exists for expression; it exists for influence and ultimately consumption; and today more than ever it exists for export.

Sitting around and pointing a finger at every Japanese fashion labeling it as deeply intrinsic and important and special and exclusive to the culture is harmful; by doing so you are denying a contemporary creative base the autonomy to evolve and speak for itself. “Japan is a land of tradition” yeah, okay, but it doesn’t live in a fucking vacuum trembling from fear of the peeking gaijin.

What is happening here is a young girl is dressed in a fashion she cannot identify, which can be a case of cultural appropriation when “plagiarizing and/or thieving” is the mode of operation. For example: Someone latching on to a visual they saw while watching a Japanese film/whatever then went on to claim the style as their own creation and started selling it without ever acknowledging their influences or affirming the creatives whose work they are leeching from. Which is of course a lot to assume of a middle schooler to be intentionally doing. 

And that is totally Cory laying the smack down on his own daughter in front of an entire class. Double messed up. 

Wait, if that is his daughter, then, isn’t he ultimately responsible for actually paying for these clothes?

Did he let her buy these clothes so he could shame her in class? what the hell.

I think I want to see this episode myself. What I’m seeing from just this though is a confusion of cultural appropriation and cultural DIFFUSION.

I had to explain this to someone using Bronies as an example (Which was a bad idea because he desperately wanted to paint bronies in a positive light being a brony himself.) That enjoying the show is diffusion and taking it away from the source and claiming it never belonged to the source (“this show isn’t for little girls”) is appropriation.

What I think people are getting confused about here is the fetishization of a culture. Like fetishizing people. Pretending you are a part of the culture’s traditions, wearing them like a fashion. I don’t speak for the japanese but I cannot fucking see a fashion being appropriated unless someone literally steals the idea and that only matters if someone is making money off of stolen designs.

She’s enjoying a consumer aspect of a culture. Her presentation is tacky but who in their right mind should really give a shit about that?

Christ thank you

(via xiggymatsu)

ask-bartolomeo:


Z-Zoro senpai said he’s counting on me!!! I.. I’VE BECOME THE RIGHT-HAND MAN OF LUFFY’S SENPAI’S R-R-RIGHT-HAND MAN!!!!

I refuse to believe he is real ask-bartolomeo:


Z-Zoro senpai said he’s counting on me!!! I.. I’VE BECOME THE RIGHT-HAND MAN OF LUFFY’S SENPAI’S R-R-RIGHT-HAND MAN!!!!

I refuse to believe he is real ask-bartolomeo:


Z-Zoro senpai said he’s counting on me!!! I.. I’VE BECOME THE RIGHT-HAND MAN OF LUFFY’S SENPAI’S R-R-RIGHT-HAND MAN!!!!

I refuse to believe he is real ask-bartolomeo:


Z-Zoro senpai said he’s counting on me!!! I.. I’VE BECOME THE RIGHT-HAND MAN OF LUFFY’S SENPAI’S R-R-RIGHT-HAND MAN!!!!

I refuse to believe he is real ask-bartolomeo:


Z-Zoro senpai said he’s counting on me!!! I.. I’VE BECOME THE RIGHT-HAND MAN OF LUFFY’S SENPAI’S R-R-RIGHT-HAND MAN!!!!

I refuse to believe he is real ask-bartolomeo:


Z-Zoro senpai said he’s counting on me!!! I.. I’VE BECOME THE RIGHT-HAND MAN OF LUFFY’S SENPAI’S R-R-RIGHT-HAND MAN!!!!

I refuse to believe he is real

ask-bartolomeo:

Z-Zoro senpai said he’s counting on me!!! I.. I’VE BECOME THE RIGHT-HAND MAN OF LUFFY’S SENPAI’S R-R-RIGHT-HAND MAN!!!!

I refuse to believe he is real

notlangley:

I cannot be stopped. notlangley:

I cannot be stopped. notlangley:

I cannot be stopped. notlangley:

I cannot be stopped. notlangley:

I cannot be stopped. notlangley:

I cannot be stopped. notlangley:

I cannot be stopped. notlangley:

I cannot be stopped. notlangley:

I cannot be stopped. notlangley:

I cannot be stopped.

greenwithenby:

if you can’t handle me at my image

you don’t deserve me at my image

(via hauntbear)

hajime-nii:

this is the cutest most beautiful haikyuu page and i need yall to agree with me i mean it’s amazing
hajime-nii:

this is the cutest most beautiful haikyuu page and i need yall to agree with me i mean it’s amazing
hajime-nii:

this is the cutest most beautiful haikyuu page and i need yall to agree with me i mean it’s amazing
hajime-nii:

this is the cutest most beautiful haikyuu page and i need yall to agree with me i mean it’s amazing

hajime-nii:

this is the cutest most beautiful haikyuu page and i need yall to agree with me i mean it’s amazing

(via bepsiboy)

valvala:

also there were like way too many sexual jokes in teenage mutant turtles. not that there were A LOT but hearing a teenage mutant ninja turtle say “she’s so hot i can feel my shell getting tight” is not something i ever wanted to hear and now that i have i cannot unhear it

(via hauntbear)

caligulascookie:

r-u-seri0us:

88-red-balloons:

catladyofficial:

the best headline i’ve ever read.

yes. apparently a kid was screaming in line behind him about wanting pie, so he bought every single one. 23 pies. then slowly ate them as he stared at the kid and kid’s mom.

This is amazing

OKAY so my mom found this article (or one about the same event) on Facebook. Basically what happened was, this guy went into BK with a headache, and while he was in line this kid and his mother enter the restaurant. The kid begins throwing a fit, screaming (I quote) “I want a fucking pie!” This is a child, mind you. His mother, on the phone, ignores the kid. The man’s headache got worse because of this screaming kid and he asked the woman if she could control her child. She told him to stop telling him how to raise her kid and went back to talking on the phone. So the guy orders his burger and all the pies they had- 23. He proceeded to the exit, only to hear the woman yell, “What do you mean, you don’t have any pies?” The cashier helplessly points out the man who bought all the pies. Our hero, to rub salt in the wound, slowly starts eating a pie before leaving.

(via xiggymatsu)

particlecollisions:

particlecollisions:

Self defence sprays that are legal to carry and use in the United Kingdom
Image 1: FarbgelImage 2: StoppaRed
I’ve seen a lot of people (mostly women, for reasons which may be obvious) speaking about being worried when going out, be it alone or even with friends, both in the day and at night. I know that a lot of female friends of mine carry around a can of antiperspirant or a pot of pepper to use if they’re ever attacked. What I know a lot of people don’t realise is that there are products out there which work in a violent situation and help in catching the assailant for the best part of a week afterwards.
Known as ‘criminal identifiers’, these sprays are brightly coloured dyes which can be sprayed in the face of an attacker. Unlike things such as CS or Pepper sprays, criminal identifier sprays are legal in the UK.
There’s a few available on the market, with farbgel and Mace’s Stoppared being the mostly highly recommended.
What these sprays do is release a sticky, brightly coloured dye. It’s difficult to wipe away and stains the skin a bright red colour. No matter how hard an attacker might try to remove it from their skin and clothing, the staining typically lasts for around a week and doesn’t even start to fade until after a few days have passed.
Unlike CS and Pepper sprays (which, again, aren’t legal in the UK) criminal identifier sprays don’t cause irritation or pain to an attacker. Instead, they expand and clog up the area sprayed with a kind of sticky foam that’s difficult to wipe away. It should give you enough time to escape and report someone whose face resembles a baboon’s arse to the police.
Each can of the sprays costs around £10 each, though it may be cheaper when buying multiple canisters and if you shop around.
FarbGel 
StoppaRed UV Personal Attack Self-Defence Spray by Mace
This is an original post, but I’ve released it into the public domain. It can be shared, altered, reposted in whole or in part with no need for attribution (though obviously I would appreciate it!)

cc misandry-mermaid
particlecollisions:

particlecollisions:

Self defence sprays that are legal to carry and use in the United Kingdom
Image 1: FarbgelImage 2: StoppaRed
I’ve seen a lot of people (mostly women, for reasons which may be obvious) speaking about being worried when going out, be it alone or even with friends, both in the day and at night. I know that a lot of female friends of mine carry around a can of antiperspirant or a pot of pepper to use if they’re ever attacked. What I know a lot of people don’t realise is that there are products out there which work in a violent situation and help in catching the assailant for the best part of a week afterwards.
Known as ‘criminal identifiers’, these sprays are brightly coloured dyes which can be sprayed in the face of an attacker. Unlike things such as CS or Pepper sprays, criminal identifier sprays are legal in the UK.
There’s a few available on the market, with farbgel and Mace’s Stoppared being the mostly highly recommended.
What these sprays do is release a sticky, brightly coloured dye. It’s difficult to wipe away and stains the skin a bright red colour. No matter how hard an attacker might try to remove it from their skin and clothing, the staining typically lasts for around a week and doesn’t even start to fade until after a few days have passed.
Unlike CS and Pepper sprays (which, again, aren’t legal in the UK) criminal identifier sprays don’t cause irritation or pain to an attacker. Instead, they expand and clog up the area sprayed with a kind of sticky foam that’s difficult to wipe away. It should give you enough time to escape and report someone whose face resembles a baboon’s arse to the police.
Each can of the sprays costs around £10 each, though it may be cheaper when buying multiple canisters and if you shop around.
FarbGel 
StoppaRed UV Personal Attack Self-Defence Spray by Mace
This is an original post, but I’ve released it into the public domain. It can be shared, altered, reposted in whole or in part with no need for attribution (though obviously I would appreciate it!)

cc misandry-mermaid

particlecollisions:

particlecollisions:

Self defence sprays that are legal to carry and use in the United Kingdom

Image 1: Farbgel
Image 2: StoppaRed

I’ve seen a lot of people (mostly women, for reasons which may be obvious) speaking about being worried when going out, be it alone or even with friends, both in the day and at night. I know that a lot of female friends of mine carry around a can of antiperspirant or a pot of pepper to use if they’re ever attacked. What I know a lot of people don’t realise is that there are products out there which work in a violent situation and help in catching the assailant for the best part of a week afterwards.

Known as ‘criminal identifiers’, these sprays are brightly coloured dyes which can be sprayed in the face of an attacker. Unlike things such as CS or Pepper sprays, criminal identifier sprays are legal in the UK.

There’s a few available on the market, with farbgel and Mace’s Stoppared being the mostly highly recommended.

What these sprays do is release a sticky, brightly coloured dye. It’s difficult to wipe away and stains the skin a bright red colour. No matter how hard an attacker might try to remove it from their skin and clothing, the staining typically lasts for around a week and doesn’t even start to fade until after a few days have passed.

Unlike CS and Pepper sprays (which, again, aren’t legal in the UK) criminal identifier sprays don’t cause irritation or pain to an attacker. Instead, they expand and clog up the area sprayed with a kind of sticky foam that’s difficult to wipe away. It should give you enough time to escape and report someone whose face resembles a baboon’s arse to the police.

Each can of the sprays costs around £10 each, though it may be cheaper when buying multiple canisters and if you shop around.

FarbGel 

StoppaRed UV Personal Attack Self-Defence Spray by Mace

This is an original post, but I’ve released it into the public domain. It can be shared, altered, reposted in whole or in part with no need for attribution (though obviously I would appreciate it!)

cc misandry-mermaid

(via chokelate)

baltigo:

One Piece Anniversary: Day 5 - Foreshadowing— The mysteries I’m most looking forward to being answered (aside from the biggest ones) baltigo:

One Piece Anniversary: Day 5 - Foreshadowing— The mysteries I’m most looking forward to being answered (aside from the biggest ones) baltigo:

One Piece Anniversary: Day 5 - Foreshadowing— The mysteries I’m most looking forward to being answered (aside from the biggest ones) baltigo:

One Piece Anniversary: Day 5 - Foreshadowing— The mysteries I’m most looking forward to being answered (aside from the biggest ones) baltigo:

One Piece Anniversary: Day 5 - Foreshadowing— The mysteries I’m most looking forward to being answered (aside from the biggest ones) baltigo:

One Piece Anniversary: Day 5 - Foreshadowing— The mysteries I’m most looking forward to being answered (aside from the biggest ones)

baltigo:

One Piece Anniversary: Day 5 - Foreshadowing
— The mysteries I’m most looking forward to being answered (aside from the biggest ones)

(via xiggymatsu)

bebop-bang:

krissum:

#visual representation of what it looks like when we try to get people into gintama

This is LITERALLY trying to get people on the Gintama bandwagon
bebop-bang:

krissum:

#visual representation of what it looks like when we try to get people into gintama

This is LITERALLY trying to get people on the Gintama bandwagon
bebop-bang:

krissum:

#visual representation of what it looks like when we try to get people into gintama

This is LITERALLY trying to get people on the Gintama bandwagon
clockest:

I HAVENT STOPPED LAUGHING AT THIS 

clockest:

I HAVENT STOPPED LAUGHING AT THIS 

(via buttskun)

sherlockismyholmesboy:

unexplained-events:

Ladies and gentlemen….a spring-loaded dick in a box from the 1800s. It made for a great gift

humanity’s sense of humour has not progressed much in the last hundred years

(via sp00kyqueer)

lacigreen:

queeravenger:

wobbuffette:

cracked-dot-com-official:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

guyfitblr:

And finally someone said it


#okay but thats like… mens own doing though..#men put themselves in a box to be *masculine* and deemed makeup as a feminine product#so its literally all cis men’s fault for this…

lol misogyny backfiring on men is literally no one else’s problem but their own. also, “guyfitblr”


nobody’s fucking stopping you from putting on some foundation dude you can put it on and it’s discrete and other straight guys won’t be able to tell and it does wonders. nobody’s stopping you from moisturizing or even putting on the lightest bits of concealer. don’t worry, other straight men can’t tell

Also there’s less pressure for men to be attractive and more pressure on women to see past men’s looks for their personalities, like look how many movies star average/ugly dudes who still score modelesque girls.

step 1: create unrealistic, unattainable standards of beauty for women
step 2: build a multi-billion dollar beauty industry to sell women makeup, tell them they are worthless without it
step 3: mock and vilify women who wear makeup as vain and fake, mock and vilify women who don’t wear makeup as ugly
step 4: code makeup as exclusively feminine, make the feminine shameful, shame any and all men perceived as feminine
step 5: complain that you can’t wear makeup

all that commentary
lacigreen:

queeravenger:

wobbuffette:

cracked-dot-com-official:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

guyfitblr:

And finally someone said it


#okay but thats like… mens own doing though..#men put themselves in a box to be *masculine* and deemed makeup as a feminine product#so its literally all cis men’s fault for this…

lol misogyny backfiring on men is literally no one else’s problem but their own. also, “guyfitblr”


nobody’s fucking stopping you from putting on some foundation dude you can put it on and it’s discrete and other straight guys won’t be able to tell and it does wonders. nobody’s stopping you from moisturizing or even putting on the lightest bits of concealer. don’t worry, other straight men can’t tell

Also there’s less pressure for men to be attractive and more pressure on women to see past men’s looks for their personalities, like look how many movies star average/ugly dudes who still score modelesque girls.

step 1: create unrealistic, unattainable standards of beauty for women
step 2: build a multi-billion dollar beauty industry to sell women makeup, tell them they are worthless without it
step 3: mock and vilify women who wear makeup as vain and fake, mock and vilify women who don’t wear makeup as ugly
step 4: code makeup as exclusively feminine, make the feminine shameful, shame any and all men perceived as feminine
step 5: complain that you can’t wear makeup

all that commentary
lacigreen:

queeravenger:

wobbuffette:

cracked-dot-com-official:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

guyfitblr:

And finally someone said it


#okay but thats like… mens own doing though..#men put themselves in a box to be *masculine* and deemed makeup as a feminine product#so its literally all cis men’s fault for this…

lol misogyny backfiring on men is literally no one else’s problem but their own. also, “guyfitblr”


nobody’s fucking stopping you from putting on some foundation dude you can put it on and it’s discrete and other straight guys won’t be able to tell and it does wonders. nobody’s stopping you from moisturizing or even putting on the lightest bits of concealer. don’t worry, other straight men can’t tell

Also there’s less pressure for men to be attractive and more pressure on women to see past men’s looks for their personalities, like look how many movies star average/ugly dudes who still score modelesque girls.

step 1: create unrealistic, unattainable standards of beauty for women
step 2: build a multi-billion dollar beauty industry to sell women makeup, tell them they are worthless without it
step 3: mock and vilify women who wear makeup as vain and fake, mock and vilify women who don’t wear makeup as ugly
step 4: code makeup as exclusively feminine, make the feminine shameful, shame any and all men perceived as feminine
step 5: complain that you can’t wear makeup

all that commentary
lacigreen:

queeravenger:

wobbuffette:

cracked-dot-com-official:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

guyfitblr:

And finally someone said it


#okay but thats like… mens own doing though..#men put themselves in a box to be *masculine* and deemed makeup as a feminine product#so its literally all cis men’s fault for this…

lol misogyny backfiring on men is literally no one else’s problem but their own. also, “guyfitblr”


nobody’s fucking stopping you from putting on some foundation dude you can put it on and it’s discrete and other straight guys won’t be able to tell and it does wonders. nobody’s stopping you from moisturizing or even putting on the lightest bits of concealer. don’t worry, other straight men can’t tell

Also there’s less pressure for men to be attractive and more pressure on women to see past men’s looks for their personalities, like look how many movies star average/ugly dudes who still score modelesque girls.

step 1: create unrealistic, unattainable standards of beauty for women
step 2: build a multi-billion dollar beauty industry to sell women makeup, tell them they are worthless without it
step 3: mock and vilify women who wear makeup as vain and fake, mock and vilify women who don’t wear makeup as ugly
step 4: code makeup as exclusively feminine, make the feminine shameful, shame any and all men perceived as feminine
step 5: complain that you can’t wear makeup

all that commentary

lacigreen:

queeravenger:

wobbuffette:

cracked-dot-com-official:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

guyfitblr:

And finally someone said it

nobody’s fucking stopping you from putting on some foundation dude you can put it on and it’s discrete and other straight guys won’t be able to tell and it does wonders. nobody’s stopping you from moisturizing or even putting on the lightest bits of concealer. don’t worry, other straight men can’t tell

Also there’s less pressure for men to be attractive and more pressure on women to see past men’s looks for their personalities, like look how many movies star average/ugly dudes who still score modelesque girls.

step 1: create unrealistic, unattainable standards of beauty for women

step 2: build a multi-billion dollar beauty industry to sell women makeup, tell them they are worthless without it

step 3: mock and vilify women who wear makeup as vain and fake, mock and vilify women who don’t wear makeup as ugly

step 4: code makeup as exclusively feminine, make the feminine shameful, shame any and all men perceived as feminine

step 5: complain that you can’t wear makeup

all that commentary

(via sp00kyqueer)